TOEFL iBT Independent Speaking Task One: Objects and Events

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On this type of speaking task, you will be asked to speak about a person, place, object, or event that is familiar to you. After you hear the question, you will have 15 seconds to prepare your response and 45 seconds to speak. You will hear the directions and will NOT be able to read them.

When speaking about a object, think of ways to describe

  • What this object looks like
  • Why this object is important to you
  • What memories are connected to the object
  • What values the object represents
  • What makes the object unique from other objects you own

The following is an example of this type of TOEFL iBT speaking task:

When a person dies, family members often inherit the material possessions of the deceased loved one. Upon your death, what valuable object or material possession do you have that you would consider giving to a family member or friend. Why would you want the family member or friend to inherit this object?


You will listen to and read the speaking prompt. Here is a sample recording of how you could answer this question:

A Valuable Family Possession

This talk is effective because

  • By focusing on a hope chest and explaining why he would give it to his son Kentaro, the speaker has addressed the topic clearly and has responded effectively to all aspects of the task.
  • The speaker gives adequate support for his generalizations in the developmental paragraphs of the speech. Thus, the student has explored the issue thoughtfully and in depth.
  • The student has a barely detectable accent; his pronunciation is almost like that of a native speaker. Although there are rare isolated mispronunciations, there are no evident patterns of error.
  • Without stumbling or stuttering, the student exhibits superior fluency in speaking skills.
  • By including a thesis statement (i.e., “When I die, I will give my Oak Hope Chest to my oldest son, Kentaro, so that he will remember my father’s love that he had towards his family.”) and by including topic sentences in the developmental paragraphs of the talk which restate the key points mentioned in the thesis, the speaker has coherently and logically organized. his ideas.

Speaking about an Event


When speaking about an event, think of ways to describe

  • What one or two important scenes look like (consider using some descriptive detail from these scenes)
  • How it has changed you
  • Who the important people are (consider using one or two memorable quotes from the event)
  • What this event taught you

The following is an example of this type of speaking task:

Many people have had important events such as getting married, graduating from high school or college, or getting hired for a prestigious company. Choose an event that has meaning for you and explain how it has changed you.

You will listen to and read the speaking prompt.

Here is a sample recording of how you could answer this question:

A life-changing event

This talk is effective because

  • By choosing a meaningful event and explaining how it changed the speaker (i.e., it caused the speaker to develop an interest in coaching), the speaker has addressed the topic clearly and has responded effectively to all aspects of the task.
  • The speaker gives adequate support for his generalizations in the developmental paragraphs of the speech. Thus, the student has explored the issue thoughtfully and in depth.
  • The student has a barely detectable accent; his pronunciation is almost like that of a native speaker. Although there are rare isolated mispronunciations, there are no evident patterns of error.
  • Without stumbling or stuttering, the student exhibits superior fluency in speaking skills.
  • By including a thesis statement (i.e., “Because of this event, I decided to major in Physical Education with a special emphasis in coaching cross-country running..”) and by including topic sentences in the developmental paragraphs of the talk which restate the key points mentioned in the thesis, the speaker has coherently and logically organized. his ideas.

For more information, go here:

Michael Buckhoff’s “7 Step System to Pass the TOEFL iBT

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6 thoughts on “TOEFL iBT Independent Speaking Task One: Objects and Events

  1. I like the layout of your blog and I’m going to do the same thing for mine. Do you have any tips? Please PM ME on yahoo @ AmandaLovesYou702

  2. This video is a response to Randolph’s comments: “I am very impressed to be part of your educative exercise. thanks for the good job thus far by trying to improve knowledge of people around the world whom you don’t know and haven’t seen before. may God richly bless you as you continue to be a blessing to lot more people you can reach out to through the electronic media.”

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  3. hi Michael;
    I am very impressed to be part of your educative
    exercise. thanks for the good job thus far by trying to improve knowledge of people around the world whom you don’t know and haven’t seen before. may God richly bless you as you continue to be a blessing to lot more people you can reach out to through the electronic media .

  4. John:

    True brother true…You are always the reader to keep me honest. I encourage students to work on eliminating most traces of their non-native speaker accent, especially those aspects of their accent which interfere with meaning. TOEFLers indeed can score high on TOEFL iBT speaking with a non-native speaker accent as long as it does not negatively affect their intelligibility.

    As usual, you are correct. Do you have a link I can post? You have been giving me great comments for a while, and it is time for you to make a plug for your site.

    Cheers,

    Michael

  5. What is your reference for expressing the following requirement viz., “barely detectable accent”? I cannot see any such requirement in the speaking rubric for the TOEFL?

    “The student has a barely detectable accent; his pronunciation is almost like that of a native speaker.”

    The key TOEFL speaking requirement is called “intelligibility”. This does not necessarily imply “virtually no accent”.

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